CEOs should spend time with ground floor staff, CareerBuilder survey finds

Man standing in a hotel public space
First-line employees who deal directly with customers can often provide key insights about a company.

CEOs should be turning with greater frequency to their employees without college degrees because these are often the workers that have the most contact with customers.

First-line supervisors of retail sales workers, food service managers, insurance sales agents, computer support specialists, social and human service assistants, real estate sales agents, pharmacy technicians and medical assistants are among those who warrant attention, Michael Erwin, senior career adviser at CareerBuilder, told FierceCEO.

“All employees should be treated equally,” said Erwin. “If possible, CEOs should spend time with workers from different levels and parts of the business so they are in touch with business issues from the ground up.”

In 2017, successful CEOs put the same importance on workers with and without a college degree, according to Erwin. “All workers are important to the overall success of a company. Every employee contributes something different to a business’ bottom line.”

The comments came after a survey by CareerBuilder about the best jobs for workers in 2018 who don’t have college degrees.

All workers, regardless of degree, play an important role in the success of a business. “We found that the skills gap is felt across all types of roles, including jobs that don’t require an advanced degree. Employers are looking for workers with the right skill sets, meaning workers that don’t have degrees are still very much in demand,” Erwin said. “All workers are important to the overall success of a company. Every employee contributes something different to a business’ bottom line.”

As for a sampling of wages, computer user support specialists and insurance sales agents both have median hourly earnings in the $23 area, food service managers at in the $19 area, retail sales supervisors are in the $17 area and heavy and tractor trailer truck drivers are in the $20 area, CareerBuilder said.

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