CEO Roundup—Snapchat bolsters McDonald’s’ recruitment efforts; FCC imposes record robocalling fine

Snapchat headquarters in Venice, California.

Mars Petcare Offers Fur-Friendly Workplace Policies

Every dog should have its day—and on June 23 of every year, many U.S. companies welcome their employees’ furry friends, celebrating Take Your Dog to Work Day. To help organizations formulate pet-friendly workplace policies, Mars Petcare US, a manufacturer of animal munchies, is offering a new toolkit called Pets Work at Work. The kit offers advice on leadership and legal considerations of welcoming pets into businesses and how to communicate a pet policy internally and externally, as well as engaging (and adorable!) signage to post within offices. "We see firsthand the benefits of having pets at work with our pet-friendly office year-round," said Mars Pet Behaviorist Casey Coke Murphy. "Pets lower our blood pressure, reduce social isolation, can contribute to lower stress levels, and increase communication in the workplace—which can ultimately make a job more satisfying for employees." (Mars Petcare US)

Snapchat to Boost McDonald’s Recruitment in Hawaii

McDonald’s’ 74 fast-food outlets in Hawaii have partnered with Snapchat in order to boost recruitment efforts ahead of the busy summer months. Through “Snaplications” posted on the popular application through July 9, McDonald’s is hoping to direct potential hires to its online application process. In addition, posters of the social media application’s “Snapchat ghost” have already started to roll out in Hawaii, allowing customers to access McDonald’s’ online application by simply taking a photo of the poster through the app. The fast-food chain used a similar Snaplications execution in Australia earlier this year. (Pacific Business News)

U.K. Imports U.S. Cocktail Culture

Forget gin and scotch. British millennials—inspired by fictional TV characters such as Mad Men’s Don Draper and, more recently, by bourbon-swilling superhero Jessica Jones—are now slugging down record quantities of American whiskey. Sales grew 9% in 2016, compared with 7% for gin and a 1% decline for scotch. New brands are coming into the U.K. market every month, and distillers are wooing bar owners with special tasting nights and cocktail training for staff. The Great Eastern in Brighton now carries 130 different types of bourbon. (The Guardian)

FCC Hits Robocaller with Record $120M Fine

The Federal Communications Commission has levied its largest fine ever—$120 million—against Miami-based robocaller Adrian Abramovich, whom the agency said was responsible for 96 million misleading calls over the last three months of 2016. The calls used "neighborhood spoofing" technology, which features local area codes and the first three numbers of the recipient's own phone number in order to encourage people to pick up the receiver. Then recipients would hear a recorded message asking them to press #1 to hear about vacation deals from travel companies such as Marriott, Expedia, Hilton and TripAdvisor. But instead, they were transferred to call centers in Mexico, which would pitch them vacation packages at timeshare facilities not affiliated with the companies mentioned in the recorded messages. (USA Today)

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